A day in the Thar

Continued from the Ranthambore trip..

From Ranthambore, we took a train to Jaipur and another overnight one to Jaisalmer. As we neared Jaisalmer, the trees vanished and the landscape changed dramatically.We saw more and more army uniforms as we passed the station of Pokhran, given that Jaisalmer is just around 340 kms from the Indo Pak border.The heat was scorching in Jaisalmer.We were to travel another 40 kms to reach our desert camp situated on the edge of the Thar.As we left the Jaisalmer town behind, a vast panorama of open land stretched out on both sides of the road.It was as if we were travelling to the land of nowhere.

img_20161101_141338421As we drove towards the Rajputana desert camp (the one we had booked), we passed several others on the way, an oasis of white roofed tents with some jeeps and camels around. On reaching the camp,a row of small white,tent style cottages greeted us. The cottages were built with concrete walls and a canvas material used for the roofs. Considering the room rentals,I was initially taken aback by the almost spartan facilities, but then on second thoughts, it appeared reasonable when I considered that it’s probably much harder to get even basic facilities in a desert camp situated miles away from anywhere.

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The first thing on the agenda was a jeep safari into the desert and I visualized a leisurely drive up and down the sand dunes awaiting us. The open jeeps promptly arrived and off we went.Soon the driver veered off the road and we were bouncing over a rough shrub strewn track.We reached the “Sam” sand dunes and the driver accelerated wildly. We just managed to hang on to the vehicle by entwining our hands into jeep’s metal side bars.We went uphill on each sand dune on full throttle and hung precariously on the top before descending steeply.The wild life safari in Ranthambore seemed tame in comparison to this. As always, while hanging on for dear life, cameras are far from the mind, except for those poor individuals who seem so bent on perfecting their right “selfie” that they give up their lives for it. Having no such noble intentions myself, I am forced to use a YouTube video to show you the thrills of the Jaisalmer Jeep safaris.

We were finally dropped in the desert and we were relieved to see that all our limbs were intact and functioning.There were some people taking camels to travel deeper into the desert while many others lounged around doing photo shoots. A camel safari agent dogged our heels stating that he would show us the place where the shooting of Kareena Kapoor’s Refuge film happened.There were a group of gypsy women who were dancing and demanding money. Soon, the gypsies and the camel safari agents got tired of us and left us alone.

As I experienced the desert in it’s vastness,it reminded me of the sea and this poem I read on the walls of a hotel in Jaisalmer.

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The nights in the camps are a big attraction.People gather under the open sky and a group of rural folk artists sing and dance.Finger-foods are continuously served as you soak in the ambiance. The folk musicians used a very interesting set of musical instruments.One was called a Kartal, which is just two blocks of wood.Despite its simplicity, it produces a very interesting percussion sound.

 

The dancers performed the “Ghoomar” dance and the “Kalbelia” dance where the dancer bends her torso backwards and lifts a note using her mouth from the floor. Traditionally, the dance is performed by the Kalbelia community whose occupation consisted of catching snakes for their venom.So the Kalbelia dancers wear black and the sinuous movements resemble that of the serpents. Their performances also include dancing while balancing on top of plates and glasses, on knives and on glass shards.

Amidst the dancing and singing, night descended on the desert and it started getting chilly. There was a traditional Rajasthani dinner buffet consisting of various delicacies including Gatte ki Sabzi.

Early in the morning was our camel ride to see the sunrise. The ride was novel and we soon learnt that the trick was to keep your body loose and adjust to the camel’s rhythm of movement.

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What we didn’t bargain for however,was that we would be riding a celebrity. Our camel’s name was Michael Jackson!Β So, MJ apparently ate 20 kgs of Bajra and Jaggery ! Looking at him peacefully chewing his cud from the previous night, he was probably happier than his namesake.

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As the sun rose high over the desert, we headed back to Jaisalmer town where a magnificent “kila” and the “havelis” awaited us..

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14 thoughts on “A day in the Thar

  1. This place has been on my visit list forever! Love the photos you’ve chosen to go with this piece. And Michael Jackson?? πŸ˜€ How cute!

    New theme on the blog? Looks beautiful. Nice, clean and crisp πŸ™‚

  2. Brought back some beautiful memories of my trip to Jaisalmer in April of 2015. We had not stayed in the safari tents but had done a camel safari and spend some lovely time in the desert. We also saw the folk artists perform and had a dinner of local delicacies. Lovely tour.

  3. I liked what you say that experiencing the vastness of the desert reminded you of the sea. That’s exactly how I felt standing in front of Rann of Kutch in Gujarat – all that white sand exactly looks like sea, especially at the sunset. Reading about your experience makes me want to experience the Thar desert now.

    1. Haven’t visited the Rann of Kutch, but that must have been a great experience too. You should definitely visit the Thar. Leaves an imprint on the mind, when confronted by the magnificence of nature. Thanks for your comment.

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