Jaisalmer – The Fort City

Continued from A Day in the Desert

Even as we were leaving for our desert camp, we had glimpsed enticing sights of the golden Jaisalmer Fort located prominently atop a hilltop in the centre of the town. The Fort or the Sonar Quila (made of yellow sandstone) was of strategic importance, giving relief and respite to many a weary travellers. It’s courageous Bhati rulers,offered security to the passing caravans loaded with rich silks and precious jewels and the fort served as a crucial link connecting the east and the west,enabling trade and commerce to flourish. Given Jaisalmer’s strategic importance in the 2000-year old silk route, its no wonder that Jaisalmer is still a rich potpourri of an interesting intermingling of cultures and traditions.

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As with previous fort we had encountered, this one too had witnessed bloody sieges, massacres and the almost inevitable Jauhars. Despite the similarities, every fort feels different.Whereas the Ranthambore Fort smelt of mystery and secrecy, the Jaisalmer Fort was alive with vibrancy, not surprisingly because its one of the largest “living” forts.

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View from the fort
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View of the choc-a-bloc shops lining the bylanes of the fort

As we made our way to the fort, through the narrow and winding bylanes of Jaisalmer overlooked by buildings some reminiscent of an older era adorned by rich carvings and some cloaked by modernity, we suddenly joined the massive rush of humanity entering the fort walls.The fort houses various structures like a magnificent Jain temple, a Royal Palace and various other beautiful architectures along with a plethora of curio shops, shops selling beautiful Rajasthani works of art and eateries.

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A vendor in the fort

Since Jains constituted some of the very rich merchants passing through Jaisalmer, many of them soon settled there and the presence of Jain temples inside the fort built by the Bhati kings, is an indication of the importance they were accorded. Apart from the magnificent forts and the palaces it housed, Jaisalmer town also boasted of magnificent Havelis. One of the most striking ones was the Patwon-ki-Haweli which was constructed in 1805 by Patwa Guman Chand for his five sons. The architectural carvings on its “Jharokhas” was breathtaking and also of interest were the interesting array of household items from the past era, that was on display.

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Jain temple inside the fort
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Patwon ki Haveli
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View from Patwon ki Haveli
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The intricate carvings on the Jharokhas in Patwon ki Haveli

On the night before we were to leave, we witnessed a puppet show in a theater run entirely due to the efforts of one man, Mr. N.K. Sharma, a retired teacher.Unassuming in demeanor and impressive in what he has managed to accomplish, Mr Sharma donated his entire retirement money for the cause of keeping traditional art forms alive and to provide a decent platform for thousands of unacknowledged but extremely talented folk artists.
As the night ended to the dancing of the colorful puppets jiggling to the tunes of melodiously sung Rumi hymns, we looked forward to our next stop at Jodhpur..

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Tourist Tips:

  • If you were to visit Jaisalmer, do keep aside at least 3-4 days as there several offbeat places to see near about Jaisalmer, where you can visit old ghost towns and abandoned villages and experience the relics of the magnificent silk route.
  • We stayed at the Mystic Jaisalmer, a nice non-pricey hotel right in the center of the city. They were even considerate enough to give us free packaged breakfast for the train as we had kids with us.
  • Most of the items in the fort were supposed to 70% costlier than what you could get outside the fort, and almost all were cheaper at Jodhpur/Jaipur.

 

 

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17 thoughts on “Jaisalmer – The Fort City

  1. jaishvats

    Nice photos. I have been to Jaipur three times and this kind of triggered those memories and was kind of nostalgic though i am yet to visit jaisalmer

  2. Loved reading your travelogue Asha – You made me relive my trip there :). Loved your pics too, there are always so many new perspectives for me to learn about, even after having visited the place myself.

  3. This is a beautiful series you have been writing, what with those telling images and anecdotes. I must confess I may have missed out on some of those aspects being a bit familiar to the desert state.

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